Redding Dentist: Gum Disease May Result to Pancreatic Cancer

Dr. Parvin Carter

 

Gum Disease and Pancreatic Cancer

This article, which is written Dr. Parvin Carter DDS, MAGD, a general dentist in Redding, CA, is dicussing the link between gum disease and pancreatic cancer

Gum disease, which affects more than half of all Americans, has been linked to stroke, diabetes and other ailments. According to recent research from the Harvard Medical School involving more than 51,000 men pancreatic cancer is also linked to gum disease.

Pancreatic cancera leading cause of cancer deaths, is elusive, with vague symptoms that often lead to late diagnosis. It is an extremely difficult cancer to treat and little is known about what causes it.

“Men who had reported periodontal disease had a 64 percent higher risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who didn’t have gum disease,” said the study’s lead author, Dominique S. Michaud.

The study provides the first strong evidence that gum disease may increase pancreatic cancer risk, added Michaud, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

The pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, makes pancreatic juice, which helps break down fats and proteins in foods. The gland also produces the hormone insulin, which helps regulate blood sugar.
One possible explanation for the results is that inflammation from periodontal disease may promote cancer of the pancreas. “Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated serum biomarkers of systemic inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, and these may somehow contribute to the promotion of cancer cells,” she said.

Another explanation, according to Michaud, is that periodontal disease could lead to increased pancreatic carcinogenesis because individuals with periodontal disease have higher levels of oral bacteria and higher levels of nitrosamines, which are carcinogens, in their oral cavity. Prior studies have shown that nitrosamines and gastric acidity may play a role in pancreatic cancer.

In their 16-year study, Michaud and her colleagues followed 51,529 men who participated in the Health Professional Follow-Up Study, which began in 1986. The researchers controlled for the effects of smoking.

“Our study was a prospective study of health professionals,” Michaud said. “Not MDs, but dentists, podiatrists, veterinarians.”
“People with periodontal disease have higher blood levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker that has been associated with heart disease,” Michaud said. “Periodontal disease is also linked to heart disease in some studies.” The inflammation may somehow contribute to the promotion of cancer cells, she added.

“Pancreatic cancer is one of those diseases we don’t know much about,” she said. “Once you get it, the survival rate is very low.”
This research “confirms that inflammation may play an important role in pancreatic cancer,” she said.
According to Michaud, the findings should also “give consumers one more reason to really take care of their teeth and their oral health. I think that’s really the message.

Bottom Line:

Periodontitis is a silent disease. People with the disease rarely experience pain and may not be aware of the problem. Healthy habits and good oral hygiene are critical in preventing gum disease. A periodontal examination by a general dentist twice a year should reveal any incipient or progressive problems. A full mouth series of x-rays is advised. This will alert the dentist to early bone loss and other disorders of the oral cavity.
Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertises are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 368 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

Button4Blog

Redding Dentist: Bad Breath Remedies?

Logo-23K

Bad breath can have as devastating  effect on a relationship as one’s cosmetic appearance. Fortunately, this problem is often easy to fix. What helps: Good oral hygiene, regular visits to your dentist, and ruling out any underlying conditions or other factors (please see below) that could make your breath less than pleasant.

Causes of  Bad Breath ( Halitosis)?

Bad breath has many causes, including the following:

  • Tobacco use. If you smoke, quit. Your bad breath may be due to other causes, too, but tobacco use is a guarantee of bad breath. If you are ready to quit, ask your doctor or dentist for advice and support.
  • Dry mouth. If your mouth is extremely dry, there is not enough saliva to wash away excess food particles and bacteria, which can cause an unpleasant smell if they build up on the teeth.
  • Infections. Bad breath that seems to have no other cause may indicate an infection elsewhere in the body. If you have chronic bad breath and your dentist rules out any oral problems, see your doctor for an evaluation. Bad breath can be a sign of a range of conditions including respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis or bronchitis, diabetes, or liver and kidney problems, so it’s important not to ignore the problem.
  • Drinking alcohol. Alcohol-containing beverages may promote a dry mouth and cause bad breath. So don’t forget to floss after an evening out on the town, no matter how much you’re tempted to hop into bed and forget about it.
  • What you eat, or don’t eat. Certain foods, such as garlic, contribute to bad breath, but only temporarily. Once they are absorbed into the bloodstream, the smell is expelled through the breath, but the odors remain until the body processes the food, so there’s no quick fix.
  • Early morning. Saliva stops flowing while you sleep, so you may be prone to bad breath in the morning. If so, mornings may be the best time for your daily dental flossing.
  • Being hungry or thirsty. When you’re dehydrated, there’s not as much saliva in your mouth, so you’re prone to bad breath and increased bacterial buildup. Drink enough fluids and remember to floss. Also, remember that chewing food increases the saliva in your mouth, so if you’re skipping meals or dieting, you may develop bad breath.
  • Tongue bacteria.  Bacterial growth on the tongue accounts for significant number of cases of  bad breath.

How to Stop Bad Breath?

  • Keep good oral hygiene. Brushing thoroughly twice a day and flossing daily. Regular visits to your dentist, and ruling out any underlying conditions.
  • Stay hydrated. If you can’t brush your teeth after a meal, drinking a lot of water can help speed up the process of cleaning harmful bacteria and debris from between your teeth. Drinking milk can even help deodorize some offensive breath odors.Avoid sugary drinks.
  • Don’t drink too much coffee. It may be tasty, but coffee is a tough smell to get off the back of your tongue. Consider switching to an herbal or green tea.
  • Chew sugarless gum. Doing so 20 minutes after a meal can help with salivaflow. Gum that’s 100% xylitol-sweetened can help reduce cavities, but it’s also “kind of cooling and gives you really nice fresh breath,” Frangella says.
  • Be careful with breath mints. Sugar-free mints are OK for a quick fix but only mask the offensive smell and don’t do anything to remove harmful bad bacteria. Tempted to pick up a sugary mint as you leave your favorite restaurant? Don’t. The sugar will only sit on your teeth and make the problem worse, Frangella says.
  • Use a tongue scraper. Consider using a tongue scraper like the one featured in the Scope Outlast Minibrush. Simply hold the scraper at the back of your tongue, and bring it forward, scraping gently but firmly along the tongue as you go. Another easy fix?

Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign Center. She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800 hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertise are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior and sedation dentistry.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 368 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

Button4Blog

How to Save Money With the Dentist

Dr. Parvin Carter

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing, flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”.

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar containing foods, carbohydrates,  Bacteria in your mouth make acids. When you eat fermentable carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth  can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes.Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called cavities.

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and  attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops on the teeth.

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results to calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened dental plaque.Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease and the use of prescription medications.

Calculus formations results to periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out.

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies  suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease have also been linked to stroke.   latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and Periodontal

disease.

Bottom Line:

If you like to reduce visiting your dentist do the followings:

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and check up.

3) Eat  mouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash immediately after. There is  a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great .

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certcertificate of  Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 340 patients with Invisalign

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

Button4Blog