Dentist in Redding: Hitler hated visiting the dentist

Hitler was known to hate the dentist.

Hitler was known to hate the dentist! Source:http://dailym.ai/1gJ8wZa

 

The future Führer of Nazi Germany was known to hate the dentist.
A postcard sent during the First World War by Adolf Hitler after a visit to the dentist – in which he claimed to have had 19 teeth removed – has turned up in Munich.

‘You can’t imagine how nice I looked,’ he wrote to a fellow soldier called Karl Lanzhammer who was stationed in France. ‘Now I’m better.’

The card, dated December 21, 1916, has been authenticated after it was found in the collection of a postcard collector.

On the front of the card is a picture of Berlin’s Landwehr Canal and it is marked with the stamp of the 2nd Bavarian Infantry Regiment, Hitler’s unit at the time.

afraid of dentist?

Dentistry does not have to be scary! Source: http://klsjt.com/?p=22

 

Some patients have such a fear of dentists that they avoid making dental appointments at all, or cancel appointments they do make. They usually tell me they’ve “always” been afraid of dentists. There are several things you can try to overcome this fear:

Happy patient

Find a dentist that you are comfortable with. Sourc of picture :http://www.bestdentistguide.com/content/faqs

 

Find a Good Dentist for You. Finding a dentist who is sympathetic and understands that you are anxious and will work with you will increase your comfort. You need to feel at ease with your dentist if you want to overcome your fears, and your dentist needs to know what you fear and how they may be able to help you. Good communication also means things like rapport, body language, and using non-threatening language that you can understand. Rapport (a harmonious connection) also implies a relationship of equals, where you don’t perceive your dentist as a threatening or a condescending figure, but as a partner in your care. Communication means that you do things together with your dentist, rather than your dentist doing things to you.

Many dentists offer practices specifically targeted towards fearful people and offer a variety of solutions that may include sedation, and lots of reassurance.

Step by step

Step by Step you don’t have to do it all at once. Picture source: http://www.nestseller.com/step-by-step-guide/

Step by Step you don’t have to do it all at once. Schedule an examination so you can meet the dentist. Then come back for a cleaning. A couple of successful, low stress experiences, will help you cope.

Take a deep breath through your mouth hold it a bit and then slowly exhale. If you feel you are having an anxiety attack it helps to breath deeply from your stomach than from the chest to the stomach.

breath slowly

Take a deep breath through your mouth and hold it, and then slowly exhale. Source: http://www.mentalhelp.net/poc/view_doc.php?type=doc&id=35085

Set a date after your dentist appointment to do something fun. Or, reward yourself if you think you have overcome your fear.

Muscle relaxation. Progressive muscle relaxation involves tensing and then releasing one group of muscles at a time. It can help to slow heart rate and promote calmness. Just a few minutes of progressive muscle relaxation may help during an appointment.

distraction

Focus your mind elsewhere to lessen anxiety. Source: http://www.ehow.com/how_2253213_get-distracted.html

Distraction. Focusing your mind elsewhere is another way to lessen anxiety and pain. The more complicated the task, the better. Listening to music may help. But counting tiles on the ceiling or slats on a window blind may be even more effective.

 

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign. For more information please check http://www.drparvincarter.com

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Redding Dentist: Do You Get Headaches?

According to the National Headache Foundation, over 45 million Americans suffer from chronic, recurring headaches and of these, 28 million suffer from migraines. About 20% of children and adolescents also experience significant headaches. There are many different types of headaches.

Cluster Headache Cluster headaches are relatively uncommon, but these headaches cause excruciating, sharp-as-knife pain around one eye. Attacks occur daily in clusters of weeks or months, then disappear completely for months or years. They are four times more common in men than women, and typically start before age 30. See your doctor if you think you have a cluster headache.

Rebound Headache

Rebound headaches occur in less than 2% of patients whose persistent headache pain causes them to overuse headache medication. These headaches may worsen with physical or mental exertion. Talk to your doctor if you feel that you may be experiencing these headaches.

Sinus Headache

Sinus headaches are headaches with a deep and constant pain in the cheekbones, forehead, or bridge of the nose. This pain usually intensifies with sudden head movement or straining and is usually accompanied by symptoms such as fever, runny nose, and clogged ears. tension headaches and migraine headaches are most common. Since these two types of headaches may be treated differently, determining which type you have is a critical step in pain relief.

Tension Headache

Tension headaches are sometimes called muscle contraction headaches. The pain is usually a dull ache on both sides of the head and has been described as feeling like a tight band across the front of the head. It is also associated with stiffness of the neck/shoulder and frequent pain.

Migraine Headache

Migraine headaches produce moderate to severe pounding or throbbing pain, common on one side of the head. Migraine pain is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, dizziness, and sensitivity to light and/or sounds.

TMJ Migraine Headache:

If you suffer with complaints of migraine or other headache pain, I would like to make you aware of one basic scientific fact that is undeniable: TMJ or jaw joint dysfunction, is the major cause of your suffering. Your doctors, including neurologist, have simply not received the dental training required to be able to diagnose TMJ problems and how they relate to your migraine or headache pain. That is the main reason there is so much skepticism about TMJ treatment from the medical profession. Physicians just don’t know enough about it. Furthermore, many dentists jump on the bandwagon thinking that they can cure these ailments, only to find that they lack the skill and experience to get the job done.

Symptoms of TMJ Migraine Headache:

How are TMJ migraine patients evaluated? Dental and medical evaluation,clinical exam, including examination of chewing muscles and other related muscle to the joints. Observing patient’s difficulty of the opening the mouth and chewing. Diagnostic dental x-rays and medical x-rays of the joints.  Lateral skull x-rays with analysis to determine the skeletal component of the joint.

Night Guards: Some dentists use night guards to treat TMJ. My studies have shown that use of night guard does not help  TMJ headaches, but it will exacerbate the symptoms and does not offer any solution to the cause.

Successful Treatment Options for TMJ Disorder:

First line of defense is to seek help with a dentist whom has extensive training, continuous studies and experience on this area. Treatment is customized for the individual patient with definitive diagnosis. Every patient has a different degree of the derangement of the TMJ Disorder.Most important is to diagnose and come up with a treatment plan to that diagnosis.

If you suspect that you might have TMJ Migraine, I would be glad to examine you, to see if this is in deed the case and plan a treatment for you. This examination would be free of charge to you.

 

 

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In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 400 patients with Invisalign.To find out more please see http://www.parvincarter.com

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Dentist in Redding: Do You Spread Cavities to your Baby?

The easiest way to catch a cavity is when a mother is feeding a child. The mother will taste the food to check the temperature and then continue feeding the child. Immediately, that’s how kids get cavities.

feeding a child

Your kid could get cavity when you taste her food

According to the study by researchers at University of Louisville School of Dentistry, mothers with cavities can transmit caries-producing oral bacteria to their babies when they clean pacifiers by sticking them in their own mouths or by sharing spoons.

Tooth decay can have a detrimental effect on a child’s quality of life, performance in school and success in life.

Couples Kissing Wallpapers1

Kissing between couples can transfer cavity causing bacteria .

Kissing between couples can also cause the spread of harmful bacteria. Dr Irwin Smigel has seen many patients, particularly women, who have clean, healthy mouths, discover a cavity or two after entering into a relationship with a man who has cavities, gum disease or hasn’t been to the dentist in several years.

One 40-year-old woman who had never had a cavity suddenly got two after she began dating a man who had periodontal disease and hadn’t been to a dentist in 18 years.

man pull out teeth_2

A man who has periodontal disease can transfer cavity causing bacteria to his partner.

Infants and children are especially vulnerable to the bacteria. A 2007 study conducted at the University of Queensland’s School of Dentistry in Australia found that cavity-causing bacteria was found in the mouths of 30% of 3-month-old babies and more than 80% of 24-month-olds with primary teeth.

Mothers with dental disease present a very high risk to their children:

 

baby with bottle

The easiest way to catch a cavity is when a mother is feeding a child.

Are Cavities Really Contagious?

Just as a cold virus can be passed from one person to the next, so can cavity-causing bacteria. One of the most common is Streptococcus Mutans. Infants and children are particularly vulnerable to it, and studies have shown that most pick it up from their caregivers — for example, when a mother tastes a child’s food to make sure it’s not too hot .

How to prevent spread of cavity causing bacteria to your baby:

 

Redding Dentist: Heart Disease and Mouth Connections

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), heart disease will claim an estimated 600,000 lives this year, making it America’s number one killer.This year more than 920,000 Americans will have a heart attack; nearly half of them will occur without prior symptoms or warning signs.

What is the link between Heart disease and oral health?

According to Harvard Medical School Health reports Oral bacteria could  harm blood vessels or cause blood clots by releasing toxins that resemble proteins found in artery walls or the bloodstream. The immune system’s response to these toxins could harm vessel walls or make blood clot more easily. It is also possible that inflammation in the mouth revs up inflammation throughout the body, including in the arteries, where it can lead to heart attack and stroke.

cholestrol_httpwww.cdc.govfeaturesheartdisease

Inflammation in the mouth can cause inflammation in the arteries

Oral health can provide warning signs for other diseases , including heart disease:

Heart disease and oral health are linked. There are two different connections between heart disease and your oral health:

  1. Studies have shown that people with moderate or advanced gum (periodontal) disease are more likely to have heart disease than those with healthy gums.
  2. Oral health holds clues to overall health. Studies have shown that oral health can provide warning signs for other diseases or conditions, including heart disease.Oral manifestations of systemic diseases are potential indicators of an array of conditions.

Oral cavity is a mirror that reflects many of the human body’s internal secrets.

During my 30 years of practicing dentistry, I have developed the ability of looking at a patient’s dental health and tell, in general, whether the person is healthy overall. I have sent many of my patients, who had no idea about their general health, to a physician and in many cases they have come back and thanked me for saving their lives.

Gum Disease

Oral cavity, like a mirror, reflects many of the human body’s internal secrets

 Gum disease can cause heart disease, stroke and diabetes

Because the mouth is a pathway to the body, people who have chronic gum disease are at a higher risk for heart attack, according to the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD). Gum disease (called gingivitis in its early stages and periodontal disease in the late stages) is caused by plaque buildup.

Warning signs for gum disease:

Gum disease may progress painlessly, producing few obvious signs. However, the signs that you may have gum disease include:

  • Gums that bleed during and after tooth brushing
  • Red, swollen, or tender gums
  • Persistent bad breath or bad taste in the mouth
  • Receding gums
  • Formation of deep pockets between teeth and gums
  • Loose or shifting teeth
  • Changes in the way teeth fit together upon biting down, or in the fit of partial dentures.

How is gum disease treated?

  • Your dentist or dental hygienist will remove the plaque and tartar both above and below your gum line. This procedure, called root planing and scaling, makes it harder for plaque to stick to the teeth.
  • Your dentist may give you antibiotics to kill bacteria and stop the infection. They may be put directly on the gums, swallowed as pills or capsules, or inserted into the pockets in your gums.
antibiotics

Your dentist may give you antibiotics to kill bacteria and stop the infection

  • You may need surgery if these treatments don’t control the infection or if you already have severe damage to your gums or teeth. Surgery options may include:
    • Gingivectomy, which removes and reshapes loose, diseased gum tissue to get rid of the pockets between the teeth and gums where plaque can build up.
    • A flap procedure, which cleans the roots of a tooth and repairs bone damage.
    • Extraction, to remove loose or severely damaged teeth.
  • After surgery, you may need to take antibiotics or other medicines to aid healing and prevent infection.

After treatment, you will need to keep your mouth disease-free by preventing plaque buildup. You will need to brush carefully and thoroughly after all meals and snacks and floss daily. Your dentist will probably prescribe an antibacterial mouthwash.

Your dentist will schedule follow-up appointments regularly for cleaning and to make sure that the disease has not returned

Risk factors for gum disease:

  • Smoking.  Need another reason to quit smoking? Smoking is one of the most significant risk factors associated with the development of gum disease. Additionally, smoking can lower the chances for successful treatment.
  • Hormonal changes in girls/women. These changes can make gums more sensitive and make it easier for gingivitis to develop.
  • Diabetes. People with diabetes are at higher risk for developing infections, including gum disease.
  • Other illnesses. Diseases like cancer or AIDS and their treatments can also negatively affect the health of gums.
  • Medications. There are hundreds of prescription and over the counter medications that can reduce the flow of saliva, which has a protective effect on the mouth. Without enough saliva, the mouth is vulnerable to infections such as gum disease. And some medicines can cause abnormal overgrowth of the gum tissue; this can make it difficult to keep teeth and gums clean.
Genetic factor

Some people are more prone to severe gum disease than others, due to their genetic factor

  • Genetic susceptibility. Some people are more prone to severe gum disease than others.

While regular dental exams are necessary to remove tartar and detect early signs of gum disease, oral health begins by properly caring for your teeth and gums at home. Here are some measures you can take to prevent gum disease and keep your teeth for a lifetime:

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure:

  • Brush for two to three minutes, at least twice a day, with fluoridated toothpaste. Be sure to brush along the gumline.
  • Floss twice a day  to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can’t reach. Don’t like to floss? Try a floss holder, which can make it easier to insert floss between teeth.
flossing

Floss twice a day, to remove plaque from places your toothbrush can’t reach

  • Although not a substitute for brushing and flossing, a mouth rinse can reduce plaque up to 20 percent.
  • Eat a healthy diet. Starchy and sugary foods increase plaque, and only a healthy diet provides the nutrients necessary (vitamins A and C, in particular) to prevent gum disease.
Health diet

Eat a healthy diet. to avoid dental health problems.

  • Avoid cigarettes and smokeless tobacco, which may contribute to gum disease and oral cancer.
  • Be aware that certain medications can also aggravate gum disease, including oral contraceptives, antidepressants and heart medicines.
excercize

Exercise regularly for better overall health

  • Exercise preventive care and schedule regular checkups — the surest way to detect early signs of periodontal disease.
  • Have your dentist correct problems, such as faulty fillings, crowded teeth or teeth-grinding.

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 380 patients with Invisalign.

Did you enjoy this blog? if yes would you send it to a friend please?

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Redding Dentist: Gum Disease May Result to Pancreatic Cancer

Dr. Parvin Carter

 

Gum Disease and Pancreatic Cancer

This article, which is written Dr. Parvin Carter DDS, MAGD, a general dentist in Redding, CA, is dicussing the link between gum disease and pancreatic cancer

Gum disease, which affects more than half of all Americans, has been linked to stroke, diabetes and other ailments. According to recent research from the Harvard Medical School involving more than 51,000 men pancreatic cancer is also linked to gum disease.

Pancreatic cancera leading cause of cancer deaths, is elusive, with vague symptoms that often lead to late diagnosis. It is an extremely difficult cancer to treat and little is known about what causes it.

“Men who had reported periodontal disease had a 64 percent higher risk of pancreatic cancer compared to those who didn’t have gum disease,” said the study’s lead author, Dominique S. Michaud.

The study provides the first strong evidence that gum disease may increase pancreatic cancer risk, added Michaud, an assistant professor of epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

The pancreas, a gland behind the stomach, makes pancreatic juice, which helps break down fats and proteins in foods. The gland also produces the hormone insulin, which helps regulate blood sugar.
One possible explanation for the results is that inflammation from periodontal disease may promote cancer of the pancreas. “Individuals with periodontal disease have elevated serum biomarkers of systemic inflammation, such as C-reactive protein, and these may somehow contribute to the promotion of cancer cells,” she said.

Another explanation, according to Michaud, is that periodontal disease could lead to increased pancreatic carcinogenesis because individuals with periodontal disease have higher levels of oral bacteria and higher levels of nitrosamines, which are carcinogens, in their oral cavity. Prior studies have shown that nitrosamines and gastric acidity may play a role in pancreatic cancer.

In their 16-year study, Michaud and her colleagues followed 51,529 men who participated in the Health Professional Follow-Up Study, which began in 1986. The researchers controlled for the effects of smoking.

“Our study was a prospective study of health professionals,” Michaud said. “Not MDs, but dentists, podiatrists, veterinarians.”
“People with periodontal disease have higher blood levels of C-reactive protein, an inflammatory marker that has been associated with heart disease,” Michaud said. “Periodontal disease is also linked to heart disease in some studies.” The inflammation may somehow contribute to the promotion of cancer cells, she added.

“Pancreatic cancer is one of those diseases we don’t know much about,” she said. “Once you get it, the survival rate is very low.”
This research “confirms that inflammation may play an important role in pancreatic cancer,” she said.
According to Michaud, the findings should also “give consumers one more reason to really take care of their teeth and their oral health. I think that’s really the message.

Bottom Line:

Periodontitis is a silent disease. People with the disease rarely experience pain and may not be aware of the problem. Healthy habits and good oral hygiene are critical in preventing gum disease. A periodontal examination by a general dentist twice a year should reveal any incipient or progressive problems. A full mouth series of x-rays is advised. This will alert the dentist to early bone loss and other disorders of the oral cavity.
Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertises are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 368 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

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Redding Dentist: How to Stop Teeth Grinding in Sleep

Dr. Parvin Carter

Most people probably grind and clench their teeth from time to time. Occasional teeth grinding, medically called bruxism, does not usually cause harm. However,frequent and severe teeth grinding can lead to jaw disorders, headaches, earache, Jaw clicking, damaged teeth and other oral health complications.

Why Do People Grind Their Teeth?

Cause of teeth grinding are thought to be related to stress, anxiety, abnormal bite, missing or crooked teeth.There is also a strong association between Bruxism and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is a sleep disorder where your breathing is interrupted during your sleep.

How Do I Find Out if I Grind My Teeth?

People with severe bruxism can break dental fillings or damage their teeth. Rubbing the teeth together can cause the outer layers of enamel to wear away, exposing dentin. This can result in tooth sensitivity. Severe Bruxism also has been blamed for:

  • Rhythmic contractions of the jaw muscles
  • A grinding sound at night, which may disturb the sleep of someone who shares a bedroom with you
  • A dull morning headache
  • Jaw muscles that are tight or painful – This can make it uncomfortable, even painful, to open your mouth wide, especially in the morning
  • Long-lasting pain in the face
  • Damaged teeth, broken dental fillings and injured gums
  • Painful jaw joint
  • Swelling (occasionally) on the side of your lower jaw caused by clenching. Chronic clenching exercises the jaw muscles. Like lifting weights, this makes the muscles grow larger. Once you stop clenching, the muscles will shrink and the swelling will go away.

Why Is Teeth Grinding Harmful?

In some cases, chronic teeth grinding can result in a fracturing, loosening, or loss of teeth. The chronic grinding may wear teeth down to stumps. When these events happen, bridgescrownsroot canalsimplants, partial dentures, and even complete dentures may be needed.

Not only can severe grinding damage teeth and result in tooth loss, it can also affect your jaws, resulting to hearing loss, cause or worsen TMD/TMJ, and even change the appearance of your face.

How do I Stop Grinding My Teeth in Sleep?

Stress reduction and anxiety management may reduce Bruxism in people prone to the condition.

  • Try to reduce your daily stress and learn relaxation techniques.
  • Get plenty of sleep.
  • Learn physical therapy stretching exercises to help restore a normal balance to the action of the muscles and joints on each side of the head.
  • Relax your face and jaw muscles throughout the day. The goal is to make facial relaxation a habit.
  • Avoid or cut back on foods and drinks that contain caffeine, such as colas, chocolate, and coffee.
  • Avoid alcohol. Grinding tends to intensify after alcohol consumption.
  • Train yourself not to clench or grind your teeth. If you notice that you clench or grind during the day, position the tip of your tongue between your teeth. This practice trains your jaw muscles to relax.
  • Relax your jaw muscles at night by holding a warm washcloth against your cheek in front of your earlobe.

If none of these helped and you observed continuing damage to your teeth,  ear aches, jaw pain and other TMJ symptoms, see your dentist to stop further oral health complications. Dentists who have more experience in evaluating and treating TMJ disorders would easily evaluate and treat grinding and clinching teeth.

Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign Center. She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800 hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertise are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior and sedation dentistry.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 365 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

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Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign Center. She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800 hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertise are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior and sedation dentistry.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 365 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

Web Site The Doctor Invisalign Dental Services Testimonial Hours
Appointment Education Feed Back Refer Us Contact Us Mobile Web

Button4Blog

Redding Dentist: Bad Breath Remedies?

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Bad breath can have as devastating  effect on a relationship as one’s cosmetic appearance. Fortunately, this problem is often easy to fix. What helps: Good oral hygiene, regular visits to your dentist, and ruling out any underlying conditions or other factors (please see below) that could make your breath less than pleasant.

Causes of  Bad Breath ( Halitosis)?

Bad breath has many causes, including the following:

  • Tobacco use. If you smoke, quit. Your bad breath may be due to other causes, too, but tobacco use is a guarantee of bad breath. If you are ready to quit, ask your doctor or dentist for advice and support.
  • Dry mouth. If your mouth is extremely dry, there is not enough saliva to wash away excess food particles and bacteria, which can cause an unpleasant smell if they build up on the teeth.
  • Infections. Bad breath that seems to have no other cause may indicate an infection elsewhere in the body. If you have chronic bad breath and your dentist rules out any oral problems, see your doctor for an evaluation. Bad breath can be a sign of a range of conditions including respiratory tract infections, chronic sinusitis or bronchitis, diabetes, or liver and kidney problems, so it’s important not to ignore the problem.
  • Drinking alcohol. Alcohol-containing beverages may promote a dry mouth and cause bad breath. So don’t forget to floss after an evening out on the town, no matter how much you’re tempted to hop into bed and forget about it.
  • What you eat, or don’t eat. Certain foods, such as garlic, contribute to bad breath, but only temporarily. Once they are absorbed into the bloodstream, the smell is expelled through the breath, but the odors remain until the body processes the food, so there’s no quick fix.
  • Early morning. Saliva stops flowing while you sleep, so you may be prone to bad breath in the morning. If so, mornings may be the best time for your daily dental flossing.
  • Being hungry or thirsty. When you’re dehydrated, there’s not as much saliva in your mouth, so you’re prone to bad breath and increased bacterial buildup. Drink enough fluids and remember to floss. Also, remember that chewing food increases the saliva in your mouth, so if you’re skipping meals or dieting, you may develop bad breath.
  • Tongue bacteria.  Bacterial growth on the tongue accounts for significant number of cases of  bad breath.

How to Stop Bad Breath?

  • Keep good oral hygiene. Brushing thoroughly twice a day and flossing daily. Regular visits to your dentist, and ruling out any underlying conditions.
  • Stay hydrated. If you can’t brush your teeth after a meal, drinking a lot of water can help speed up the process of cleaning harmful bacteria and debris from between your teeth. Drinking milk can even help deodorize some offensive breath odors.Avoid sugary drinks.
  • Don’t drink too much coffee. It may be tasty, but coffee is a tough smell to get off the back of your tongue. Consider switching to an herbal or green tea.
  • Chew sugarless gum. Doing so 20 minutes after a meal can help with salivaflow. Gum that’s 100% xylitol-sweetened can help reduce cavities, but it’s also “kind of cooling and gives you really nice fresh breath,” Frangella says.
  • Be careful with breath mints. Sugar-free mints are OK for a quick fix but only mask the offensive smell and don’t do anything to remove harmful bad bacteria. Tempted to pick up a sugary mint as you leave your favorite restaurant? Don’t. The sugar will only sit on your teeth and make the problem worse, Frangella says.
  • Use a tongue scraper. Consider using a tongue scraper like the one featured in the Scope Outlast Minibrush. Simply hold the scraper at the back of your tongue, and bring it forward, scraping gently but firmly along the tongue as you go. Another easy fix?

Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign Center. She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800 hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertise are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior and sedation dentistry.

Dr. Parvin Carter is Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 368 patients with Invisalign. To find out more please see http://drparvincarter.com.

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How to Save Money With the Dentist

Dr. Parvin Carter

Your teeth can last a lifetime if you practice basic dental care, which involves brushing, flossing regularly, eating a mouth-healthy diet, and visiting your dentist and/or dental hygienist for regular checkups and cleanings.

The problem is that most of us are not familiar with ‘mouth-healthy diet”.

Changes begin in your mouth the minute you start to eat certain foods. After eating sugar containing foods, carbohydrates,  Bacteria in your mouth make acids. When you eat fermentable carbohydrates – foods containing sugar — the bacteria in your mouth use the sugar for fuel and produce acids as a waste product.  Acidic media in your mouth  can dissolve enamel in less than five minutes.Regular acid assaults on enamel can wear holes in teeth, commonly called cavities.

Eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria

In addition to cavity formation, eating foods containing sugar help fast multiplication of bacteria which carbohydrate as fuel. These bacteria then colonize and  attach themselves to the tooth’s smooth surface. This results to dental plaque formation. Dental plaque is a biofilm, usually a pale yellow, that develops on the teeth.

Dental plaque results to Calculus formation

Continual accumulation of minerals from saliva on plaque, results to calculus or tartar formation which is a form of hardened dental plaque.Levels of calculus and location of formation varies from one person to another, and are affected by oral hygiene habits, access to professional care, diet, age, ethnic origin, time since last dental cleaning, systemic disease and the use of prescription medications.

Calculus formations results to periodontal diseases

A build-up of plaque and calculus can lead to inflamed and infected gums. Mild gum disease is called gingivitis and is not usually serious. More severe gum disease, called periodontitis, can lead to teeth falling out.

Periodontal diseases can result to heart attack and stroke

Because periodontal disease is a bacterial infection, periodontal bacteria can enter the blood stream and travel to major organs and begin new infections. Both the heart and the brain are some of the most susceptible organs.

“A lot of studies  suggest that oral health, and gum disease in particular, are related to serious conditions like heart disease,” says periodontist Sally Cram, DDS, a spokeswoman for the American Dental Association.

According to the Academy of Periodontology, people with periodontal disease are almost twice as likely to have coronary artery disease (also called heart disease). And one study found that the presence of common problems in the mouth, including gum disease (gingivitis), cavities, and missing teeth, were as good at predicting heart disease as cholesterol levels . Periodontal disease have also been linked to stroke.   latest studies showed possible link between Alzheimer disease and Periodontal

disease.

Bottom Line:

If you like to reduce visiting your dentist do the followings:

1)  Brush twice a day and floss at least once a day regularly.

2) See your dentist every six months for dental hygiene and check up.

3) Eat  mouth-healthy Food. Avoid sugary, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks. These create a favorable environment for oral bacterial growth.  They also have a drying effect, which reduces saliva flow and allows foul-smelling bacteria to linger longer.

4) If you have to eat sugary food, coffee, starchy food, coffee and alcoholic drinks make sure to rinse your mouth with a mouth wash immediately after. There is  a product on the market that targets only the bad bacteria in the mouth. It’s called EvoraPlus and it works great .

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certcertificate of  Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 340 patients with Invisalign

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What is Google Glass

Dr. Parvin Carter

There are certain inventions we know are coming.  We’ve seen them in science fiction and it is just a matter of time until technology makes them possible.

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So Google Glass is simply a real life manifestation of something we have been expecting.

google glass

Google founder Sergey Brin poses for a portrait wearing Google Glass during New York Fashion Week in September 2012.

Google Glass  is a wearable computer that is being developed by Google in the Project Glass research and development project,[8] Google Glass displays information in as smartphone-like hands-free format,[9] that can interact with the Internet via natural language voice commands.[10][11]

Glass is not a virtual reality headset. It doesn’t take over 100 percent of your view.  When you wear it, a small, translucent image can be seen when you look up.  At first you just see the current time, but if you say “OK Glass,” you get a list of things you can do.

What can you do with Google Glasses:

You can take a picture or video — Glass has a built-in camera and 12 gigabytes of memory.  Or, if you have it connected to your phone via Bluetooth, you can place a call, dictate a text or send an email.  You can also make a video call, where the person you are speaking to sees what you are seeing.

You can get driving or walking instructions.  It shows one turn per screen.  You simply have to glance up to see the direction.  In the car, its like glancing up to your sun visor, instead of down at your phone.

And you can do a web search.  If I ask it what the height of the Empire State Building is, I see a picture of the building with the answer in text. And a woman’s voice reads me the answer via the built-in speaker.

A new feature added in the past week lets you see a full web page.  You move around the page by raising and lowering your head, and looking side to side.  Touching the temple of Glass lets you “click” a link on the web page.  And yes, that looks really dorky when you do it.Glass will let you read emails or text messages, it can even read those aloud to you.

So, is Glass needed?

The navigation app shows some of the better capability, I think.  Larger tasks can be broken up into small tasks and shown to you one at a time.

A recipe app shows you the next step to perform as you cook or bake.

There is a team working on step-by-step CPR instructions so that you can read the instructions while your hands are on the victim.

The on-face camera is one of the Glass’ most immediate benefits.  I’ve seen some wonderful photos of babies taken by their mothers while holding them.  The baby sees Mom’s face; not a camera.  We get to see a baby looking at the human they most treasure and trust.

What is future development of Google Glass?

Google is encouraging developers to start building apps for its Glass augmented-reality eye-wear, even though it has yet to release the official Glass Development Kit (GDK) to help them do it.

Application of Google Glass in Health Care

This past June,  Dr. Rafael Grossman, a surgeon and one of the Google Explorers based in Maine, used Glass for something that no one else else — to our knowledge — has done yet: to live stream a surgery using a Google Glass Hangout, which he outlined in his blog.

Of course, the biggest issue with Glass is privacy; when someone is wearing the device, there’s no way to discern whether they are filming, snapping a photo, or just letting it sit there, dormant. Grossman was quick to acknowledge that this was his first concern, making sure to both get consent from the patient and to keep his or her face during the event.

He began the event by speaking to the audience, pre-operation, to describe what he was doing and once again stress the importance of maintaining a patient’s privacy. Then began the procedure, which involved endoscopically inserting a feeding tube. Grossman chose this surgery for his demo because of its relative simplicity, letting viewers see that his attention to detail was not detracted from wearing Glass.

The surgeon notes that Glass could be a very inexpensive way to help teach students and make medical advances. When the Explorer project first began, the device cost $1,500, but when it finally goes public, it’s expected to cost significantly less

As a health care provider,  I am very excited about the advantages that usage of Google Glass could offer to the patients.  However I do have privacy concerns about  Google Glass. I am really interested to hear from you .What do you think?

Google Glasses: Tech breakthrough or threat to privacy?

Your comments on either side regarding this new technology would be appreciated.

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 320 patients with Invisalign

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What is TMJ (TMD) Disorder ?

What is TMJ (TMD) Disorder ?

Posted on March 12, 2013

What is TMJ (TMD) Disorder ?

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Do you have Clicking, popping, or pain in the jaw joint? Grinding or clenching the teeth. Do you feel pain when you open your mouth? You might be suffering from TMJ.
Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) occur as a result of problems with the jaw, jaw joint and surrounding facial muscles that control chewing and moving the jaw. Some
estimates suggest that over 10 million Americans are affected. The condition appears to be more common in women than men

Symptoms of TMJ Disorders:

* Dizziness
* Muscle spasm
* Tinnitus
* Headaches
* Stress
* Toothache
* Teeth grinding
* Infection of the ears and sinuses
* Neck and shoulder pain
* Eye pain

How are the patients evaluated?

Dental and medical evaluation Diagnostic dental x-rays and medical x-rays of the joints, this defines the
bony detail of the joint, and lateral skull x-rays with analysis to determine the skeletal component of the joint.
Clinical exam, including examination of muscles of mastication and other related muscle to the joints. Also observing
Patient’s difficulty of the opening the mouth and chewing.

Treatment of TMJ Disorder

Physical Therapy:
This helps to reduce the inflammation and some relief however it would not be a permanent solution to the problem.

Medications:
Medication such as anti-inflammatory will reduce the swelling of the component of the joint

Surgery:
This is the last resort and the statistics do not show much success.

Stress Management:
This will help to reduce some of the pain, however permanent solution is necessary, or over the time damage to TMJ
will continue and cause the return of the symptoms.

Neuromuscular Therapy:
This therapy has been shown to have limited results. It is necessary to define the causative factors. After removing these factors, this type of therapies might be helpful.

Night Guard:
Use of Night Guard will exacerbate the symptoms and does not offer any solution to the cause.

Successful Treatment Options for TMJ Disorder:
First line of defense is to seek help with a dentist whom has extensive training, continuous studies and experience on this area. Treatment is customized for the individual patient with definitive diagnosis. Every patient has a different degree of the derangement of the TMJ Disorder.Most important is to diagnose and come up with a treatment plan to that diagnosis.

Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Dentistry; she is a Preferred Provider of Invisalign and the director of A Redding Invisalign Center. She received her degree of Doctor of Dental Surgery, from Indiana University Dental School, in 1982, after which she immediately opened her private practice.
In July 1990 she received fellowship award from academy of General Dentistry. This award requires 600 hours of continuing education and passing required examination. In July 2000 Dr. Carter received Mastership award from Academy of General Dentistry. This is the highest award for continuing education. This award requires 800hours of participation in dentistry specialties. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement.
Dr. Carter’s expertises are:
Invisalign, orthodontics, advanced TMJ treatment, oral surgery, sleep Disorders, placement of implants, restorations of cosmetic dentistry, whole mouth rehabilitation, fixed and removable prosthodontic, periodontics (soft tissue management), tooth and implant supported over dentures, endodontics, molars and anterior.

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