Could dentists use 3D Printer in their practice?

Dr. Parvin Carter

Recently An 83 year-old Belgian woman  become the first-ever person to receive a transplant jawbone tailor-made for her face using a 3D printer.

The transplant operation,  was necessary after the woman developed a chronic bone infection in her lower jaw, according to a BBC News report. Because of her age, reconstructive surgery would have been a risky undertaking, so doctors instead opted for the new technology.

The transplant operation, carried out in June in the Netherlands, was necessary after the woman developed a chronic bone infection in her lower jaw, according to a BBC News report. Because of her age, reconstructive surgery would have been a risky undertaking, so doctors instead opted for the new technology.

3-D printing has already  revolutionizing product development in manufacturing.

Application of 3D printing in medicine has attracted a lot attentions lately. There is a huge amount of excitement around the potential for printing human tissue. Dr Anthony Atala, director at North Carolina’s Wake Forest Institute of Regenerative Medicine, received a standing ovation at a 2011TED talk where he printed a prototype human kidney live on stage using living cells. Although a fully functioning kidney for transplant is many years away, Atala’s primitive organ produces a urine-like substance.

Lately, the Associated Press reported that doctors had, for the first time, used a 3D printer to create a life-saving artificial airway for a baby boy. The Ohio child was born with a birth defect that cause his airway to collapse, putting him at constant risk of suffocation — until doctors asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for permission to print him a new one.

Like other forms of 3D printing, living tissue is printed layer by layer. First a layer of cells is laid down by the printer, followed by a layer of hydrogel that operates as a scaffold material; then the process repeats. The cells fuse, and the hydrogel is removed to create a piece of material made entirely of human cells. This is then moved to a bioreactor, where the tissue continues to grow – as it would in nature – into its final form.

3D printing applications have expanded from precise dental and anatomical models and surgical guides to implantable devices, improved appliances for medicine delivery, and custom hearing aids and prosthetics.

3D Printers Are Revolutionizing Dentistry:

3D printers are proving to be revolutionary in medical fields, and now the technology is being used to revolutionize dentistry.

In dentistry experience and Continuing Education are everything. Dr. Parvin Carter has over 30 years of experience in Practicing General Dentistry and 25 years in Orthodontics. She has thousands of hours of advanced training. In 2000, Academy of General Dentistry awarded Dr. Carter a Certificate of Mastership (MAGD) in General Dentistry. According to the Journal of the Academy of General Dentistry, only 1% of US dentists achieve this high level of advancement. Dr. Carter is a Certified and Preferred Provider of Invisalign. She has successfully treated over 320 patients with Invisalign.

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